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  • Autorin: Annegret Kolarow / 2021

    World Water Day 2021

    March 22, 2021

    Dr. Patrick Bräutigam, group manager Reaction Engineering Water, works in collaboration with the Universität Jena on a reactor for sonophotocatalysis for use in water treatment.
    © Fraunhofer IKTS

    Even though the earth is known as the “blue planet”, only 2.5 % of its water is freshwater. And of this portion only a third can be used as drinking water. The resource is scarce and unevenly distributed: More than 2 billion people on earth live without access to clean water at home. To highlight this water crisis, the United Nations host World Water Day every year on March 22, accompanied by campaigns and activities of governmental and non-governmental organizations. We talked to Dr. Patrick Bräutigam, group manager of the working group “Reaction Engineering Water” at IKTS and head of the group “Water Technology” at the Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena about how research institutions can contribute to the fight against the water crisis, why the resource must also be protected in industrialized countries and which technologies will become relevant in the future.

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  • Dr. Sylvia Gebhardt in front of the screen printing machine.
    © Fraunhofer IKTS

    In a matter of life and death, every minute counts. If patients are treated on-site, for example at the scene of an accident, their chances of survival are increased significantly. To ensure that emergency physicians can make the right diagnosis quickly, mobile ultrasound equipment is used, among other things. This means that necessary treatment steps can be initiated at the scene of the accident.

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  • Author: Anika Peucker | Translation: Anna Knollmann, Stephanie Anderseck / 2021

    Residues of medication in our water: Can they be removed?

    January 20, 2021

    Illuminated ceramic foam for photocatalysis.
    © Fraunhofer IKTS

    Fit and agile until old age. We all dream of it. However, the older people get, the more likely the need for medicines will rise. It is not only age but also the increase in mental and psychosomatic illnesses or the intake of hormones that increases the need for pharmaceutical preparations. And take a loot at our lifestyle: the use of antibiotics in factory farming for meat fattening does its own thing.

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  • Author: Fanny Ppohontsch | Translation: Anna Knollmann / 2021

    Less plastic is more

    January 20, 2021

    Fine powder: IKTS scientist Kathrin Oelschlägel shows by way of example how much microplastics decompose in the environment over time. However, it does not decompose.
    © Fraunhofer IKTS

    Water covers two thirds of the earth's surface, making our earth the blue planet. Oceans and seas provide half of the oxygen we breathe and absorb one third of the carbon dioxide we produce. They control the climate, are economic and living space.

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  • Authors: Roland Wuchrer, Anika Peucker | Translation: Anna Knollmann / 2021

    Can German beer become even better?

    January 18, 2021

    The art of brewing is a thoroughly automated high-tech process.
    © pixabay.com

    We Germans love our "liquid bread". Especially in a sociable Christmassy round a blond is something fine! By the way: We Germans believe that we are THE beer nation. However, this is not quite true. Because at least as far as drinking is concerned, Czechs consume more. But where does beer come from? And can the rather perfect brewing process still be further optimized?

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  • Author: Anika Peucker | Translation: Anna Knollmann, Stephanie Anderseck / 2021

    Electricity from straw

    January 18, 2021

    Straw pellets for biogas production.
    © Fraunhofer IKTS

    So Rumplestiltskin's dream does come true after all! Straw can be turned into today’s gold: energy. As a biogenic waste material, straw contributes to a sustainable energy balance and supports the path towards energy production from predominantly renewable energies. It also reduces the amount of maize or other products that should be used to feed the world's hunger and not to provide energy. How is electricity produced from straw, you ask? Let us take a look at it.

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  • Author: Anika Peucker | Translation: Anna Knollmann, Stephanie Anderseck / 2021

    Fertiliser, water, bioenergy – dairy residues as a "one-stop shop" in a closed recycling circuit

    January 18, 2021

    Produced and dried magnesium ammonium phosphate (MAP). It can be used as a direct, high-quality and slowly nutrient-releasing fertilizer.
    © Fraunhofer IKTS

    Do you like milk? Many among us like it. On average, each of us drank about 52 litres in 2015 - according to figures from the German Dairy Industry Association. Not enough for that. On top of that came 6 kilograms of butter, 17 kilograms of yoghurt and 25 kilograms of cheese per head. During the production of the various dairy products, residual materials are produced that cause high disposal costs, either half or unused. A pity about that! Because they are valuable, provided we can feed them into a closed recycling circuit.

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  • Author: Anika Peucker | Translation: Anna Knollmann, Stephanie Anderseck / 2021

    Barkhausen noise - looking into the skeleton of aging steel

    January 18, 2021

    The C-BN sensor is due to its pointed probe and small measuring spot particularly suitable for measurements within angular or round small component areas, which are difficult to reach with conventional BN sensors – here, for example, on the weldseam area of a heat exchanger wall.
    © Fraunhofer IKTS | Jürgen Lösel

    Do you often drive over bridges? Even over those made of steel and reinforced concrete? Have you ever wondered how these or other steel structures are maintained? Fraunhofer IKTS, SURAGUS GmbH and dresden elektronik jointly developed the mobile Barkhausen Noise Analyzer, a pilot system for quality control of structural steel, for this purpose.

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  • Author: Uwe Fiedler | Translation: Anna Knollmann, Stephanie Anderseck / 2020

    Automotive electronics with high reliability

    December 02, 2020

    Nanoindentation at active microelectronic systems.
    © Fraunhofer IKTS | Jürgen Lösel

    The proportion of electronic components in cars is constantly increasing. Without reliable electronics, there will be no safety and comfort in road traffic in the future. Examples of innovative vehicle functions are automated driving and infotainment. In addition, there are new drive systems such as hybrid and electric motors and all-encompassing interconnection. In order to assess the suitability of semiconductor components of the latest technologies, the challenges must be identified and solution approaches evaluated. Nanoanalytics provides a powerful toolkit for this purpose.

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